Memorial Day–Remembering the Cost of Freedom

 On Monday we began the week by celebrating Memorial Day. I began wondering what the history of this special day was. I was surprised to learn that it was originally called “Decoration Day.” I guess it dates back to 1866 when the women of the North and South began to honor those killed in the Civil War by placing flowers on their graves. After WWI those ceremonies began to honor those who were killed in all the wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday and we began to officially observe it on the last Monday in May. This day is different from July 4th where we celebrate freedom. This day we observe the cost of freedom.

At the first Memorial Day ceremony held in Arlington National Cemetery, small flags were placed at every marker, starting a tradition that is carried on to this day.

Have you ever been to Arlington? I have. My father, a hero in my eyes, is buried there.

Richard E. Ruffin was born on August 24, 1927, during WWII he was in the Navy and as

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My dad’s funeral. Arlington National Cemetery.

the story goes as soon as my 6 foot four inch tall dad got off the Navel ship he walked across the street and joined the Army. During the next years he was in Korea, two deployments in Germany and one tour in Vietnam. He received the Bronze star, the Purple Heart and several commendations. How I wish I had somehow asked the right questions to learn more about that time of his life.

My dad loved America. He taught me to value the freedoms that we have. I might not like everything America does or the decisions that some of our leaders make, but I know that we have freedoms that other people do not enjoy. Why? Only one reason. Because, people like my dad fought for those freedoms, died for them, protected them.

Since this is supposed to be a blog about things on and off the stage…I’d like to remember that we have the freedom of speech.

“Freedom of speech is the right to articulate one’s opinions and ideas without fear of government retaliation or censorship, or societal sanction.”

Freedom of speech allows me to write this blog freely–to express my opinions about God, if I so desire–and to not fear government censorship. This is just one of the reasons I’m thankful for America.

This week let’s join together and remember the cost of our freedoms and the people who gave their all for us.

Here are some of my favorite quotes:

“It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God such men lived.”– George S. Patton

“My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”    – John F. Kennedy

I have never been able to think of the day as one of mourning; I have never quite been able to feel that half-masted flags were appropriate on Decoration Day.  I have rather felt that the flag should be at the peak, because those whose dying we commemorate rejoiced in seeing it where their valor placed it.  We honor them in a joyous, thankful, triumphant commemoration of what they did.  ~Benjamin Harrison

These heroes are dead.  They died for liberty – they died for us.  They are at rest.  They sleep in the land they made free, under the flag they rendered stainless, under the solemn pines, the sad hemlocks, the tearful willows, and the embracing vines.  They sleep beneath the shadows of the clouds, careless alike of sunshine or of storm, each in the windowless Place of Rest.  Earth may run red with other wars – they are at peace.  In the midst of battle, in the roar of conflict, they found the serenity of death.  I have one sentiment for soldiers living and dead:  cheers for the living; tears for the dead.  ~Robert G. Ingersoll

Do you know someone that served our country? Do you have a favorite story about them? Do you have a thought about freedom or Memorial Day? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Until next time!

Reba

The Power of Words

During this time of shelter-in-place I have really struggled to recognize what my purpose should be. I have always been an extremely active person. Even though I was shy, I wasn’t really a wallflower. I would always volunteer and work behind the scenes of anything that was going on. Soooo. now they told me I had to stay at home….basically alone. What is it that you want me to do, Lord???

I have bounced around quite a bit from day-to-day, but in the midst I joined a writer’s conference called : She Writes for Him. Wow, what an incredible three days. It was actually much more like a shelter-in-place ladies’ retreat, but it was such a blessing. My top take away? I don’t have to write a book to be considered a writer. In fact, I’m a writer even if all I do is write letters or cards. Honestly, I never thought about it that way before. It makes perfect sense. Every word you write or speak has such possibility and power.

To cement my thought process I have been taking an instagram course in which the instructor asked us to define our “soul essence.” Or, what is the main thing you want people to know about you–what makes you uniquely you? That was difficult, but I came up with this: “Encouraging others to have a voice-either, spoken, written or performed and the confidence to use it.”

In light of those two ideas I decided to repost this from the past.

So also the tongue is a small member, yet it boasts of great things. How great a forest is set ablaze by such a small fire! And the tongue is a fire, a world of unrighteousness. The tongue is set among our members, staining the whole body, setting on fire the entire course of life, and set on fire by hell. For every kind of beast and bird, of reptile and sea creature, can be tamed and has been tamed by mankind, but no human being can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison.–

James 3:5-8

During my sophomore year in college my roommate decided we should all memorize the Book of James together. I’m sorry to say that in all my years before the verses I had committed to memory did not include the wonderful truths in the book of James. Looking back on it, I don’t even really remember studying it much before that time. All of a sudden that book changed my life. I often tell people it was written just for me. The picture of  all the wickedness of the tongue burns in my memory.

  1. The tongue is a fire
  2. It is full of deadly poison
  3. It is a small member of the body but makes great boasts
  4. We have tamed every kind of creature, but cannot tame the tongue

To summarize our tongues are powerful, uncontrollable, evil and hurtful. Wow. Think about that for a moment. As much as we may try we often say things that we regret. Things that hurt others. And things that we cannot take back.

I have a vivid memory of someone that got angry at me and wrote me a note and then asked for it back. They wanted to change what they had written because they had regrets. I said no. Now you are probably thinking I am a cruel person, but it wasn’t because I didn’t forgive them. It was because a word spoken or written can never be taken back. That alone should cause us to think twice before we open our mouths.

So if the tongue can do that much damage can it do that much good as well?

Proverbs 16:24 “Kind words are like honey–sweet to the soul and healthy for the body.”

Proverbs 18:4 “A person’s words can be life-giving water; words of true wisdom are as refreshing as a bubbling brook.”

Proverbs 18:20 “Words satisfy the soul as food satisfies the stomach; the right words on a person’s lips bring satisfaction.”

The words tongue, lips, mouth and words are used over 170 times in the Bible. Our words have such power. Many of us speak hundreds of words a minute and thousands over an hour. How are you going to use yours today?

 

Please take a moment to share your words! I’d love to hear them!

Until next time!

Reba