From the Inside Out: Ramblings About The Diary of Anne Frank

When I was in third or fourth grade I read a book that I will never forget. The Diary of Anne Frank captured my attention in a way that no other book has ever done. The idea that a girl (who was not much older that I was at that time) could write so proficiently and express her thoughts in such a spell-binding manner was fascinating. For those of you who don’t know, Anne Frank went into hiding with her family in 1943. She was only thirteen. Her crime? She was Jewish.

I didn’t understand how anyone could treat another human so terribly. How could one possibly live in such a tight space, dependent fully on the help of outsiders who put their lives on the line day after day? Yet this girl said something that is life changing.

“In spite of everything, I still believe that people are really good at heart.”

She was positive, joyful and dreamed that her writing would change the world. It did.

Flash forward to 1976. My husband had the privilege of playing Peter Van Daan in a University production of “The Diary of Anne Frank.” Flash forward another twenty years and my daughter played Mrs. Van Daan in a production I directed at her high school. Another six years pass and my oldest daughter directs a production of “Diary” at the same University that Chuck portrayed Peter all those years before.

And now, I have checked a dream role off of my bucket list. For one more weekend I get to step out on that stage of become “Mrs Van Daan.”

She’s not the lead, but I think she is fascinating. She is insecure, flirty, frightened, industrious and loving. She is the most complicated character I have ever played and I have loved every second.

In the play you see Mrs. Van Daan through the eyes of a thirteen year old girl. I can only imagine what my daughter’s diary might have said about me at times she was angry with me. The point? The writings give us a unique view into the secret annex, but we must remember Anne’s writings were Anne’s thoughts and expressed honestly through Annes’ emotions.

In talking about the personality of Mrs Van Daan I began to realize that at the core of her personality were all the traits Anne writes about, but there must be something that drives her to act the way she does. I chose  insecurity and love--those traits are at the root of every reaction she has.

Did you know? She was born in 1900 in Germany. She had three siblings: Gertrude, Lotte, and Gretta. It was Anne who gave her the name of Mrs Van Daan as a code name,  as she did everyone one in the diary, in case the diary was ever discovered it would protect those she wrote about. Her real name was Auguste van Pels.

She was real. She lived, loved, laugh, feared and hoped. Much like 6 million other Jews that we may not know anything about.  This play is for everyone that died during that horrible time in our history. May we never forget.

I am thankful for a young girl who decided that writing her story was important. I am thankful that the Germans didn’t discover and destroy the book. I am thankful Otto allowed the rest of the world to see the diary.

If you haven’t documented your life in some way why not do it? Your life, your story is important. Please leave your legacy!

If you can–treat yourself to one of the remaining performances.  It is one of the finest casts I’ve ever had the privilege of sharing the stage with. The lights, set, story…it is truly special.  Please hurry though. Only four shows remain. Overshadowed.org

What about you? Have you read the book? Please take a moment to like this post, share, comment! Thank you!

Overshadowed by His Love,

 

Reba

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “From the Inside Out: Ramblings About The Diary of Anne Frank

  1. Jessica

    I visited the WW2 museum today. After experiencing Anne’s story this year, this visit had a much greater impact on me. I thank God everyday that so many men, and women, sacrificed so much to help people, like Anne, ensuring people had freedom and a voice. Sadly, not everyone was able to see the brighter tomorrow. It is frightening to think what could have happened if events turned out differently.

    Thank you for bringing this powerful story to life and the stories of those who sacrificed so much in war (I’ll Be Seeing You). It is important to remember. It is important to love. It is important to reach out and help others.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What a delight to play a role you’ve had on your bucket list for years, Reba. And what a fine job you did! I’ve often thought of the necessity for us all to leave behind a legacy for family, friends and future readers. These days, we have social media to express our feelings and share our activities, but I don’t think it will ever come close to the simplicity of a diary.☺️

    Like

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